Return to violence would be senseless and tragic, US Gen. Scott Miller warned, adding they have the military means to respond forcefully to any type of attacks against the coalition and the military means to support the Afghan security forces

AT News

KABUL: As the American and NATO Forces are on track to withdraw from Afghanistan, following the U.S. President Joe Biden’s announcement to exit troop by September 11 that also breach the previous deadline of May1, the Taliban reacted that delay in drawdown would lay out the ground for any type of act to be taken by their fighters against the foreign forces.

The White House announced that the drawdown of troops began on May 1 and would finish by September 11 this year. The predecessor administration of Donald Trump agreed on a peace deal signed in February 2020 to withdraw troops by May1 but the deadline was delayed as Biden determined a new schedule for pullout.

The U.S. Forces’ spokesman, Sonny Legget said that “Kandahar Airfield received ineffective indirect fire this afternoon; no injury to personnel or damage to equipment.”

The U.S. and NATO Forces commander, Gen. Scott Miller said that a return to violence would be senseless and tragic. “We have the military means to respond forcefully to any type of attacks against the coalition and the military means to support the Afghan security forces. That would be a mistake to move in that direction,” Miller said in a video message.

However, last year, no international force suffered casualty in conflict, the insurgents rocked the country with attacking the Afghan security forces and conducted deadly bombing blasts.

The Taliban spokesman in Doha, where the insurgents maintain a political office, Mohammad Naeem said that the foreign forces presence beyond the May 1 deadline paves the ground for “any type of acts” to be taken by their fighters but the leadership would decide about it. The number of U.S. forces in Afghanistan is over 2,000 with an additional 7,000 NATO troops.  

This comes as western media reported that the Taliban protected the U.S. forces’ bases against other militant groups in the region last year. The protection of U.S. bases against threats and attacks was agreed in a peace deal between the two sides, the report added. But the Taliban denied the report as false.